No more mandatory counselling for man convicted of perjury in Air India bombing

But other parole conditions still apply

Former Duncan resident and convicted airplane bomber Inderjit Singh Reyat isn’t required to participate in counselling anymore.

The Parole Board of Canada made the decision earlier this month, but gave no explanation for it.

The counselling was meant to address “violence, empathy and cognitive distortions”, according to court documents.

Reyat still has to abide by the other conditions of his release.

They include that he not participate in any political activities for any organization, not contact any members of the victims’ families, not associate with criminals, not possess extremist propaganda and not possess any components that could be used to build an explosive devise.

Reyat, who worked in Duncan, on Vancouver Island, as a mechanic, was the only person convicted in the 1985 Air India bombings that killed 331 people.

RELATED STORY: REYAT’S RISK OF VIOLENCE TROUBLING

During his trial, it was revealed that he bought the dynamite, the detonators and the batteries for the attacks on two airliners while he was living in Duncan.

Reyat was a member of an extremist group fighting for a Sikh homeland at the time.

He received a seven-year sentence after being convicted of perjury in 2010 for repeatedly lying during his testimony at trial.

The parole board has indicated that resulted in his co-accused not being convicted in Canada’s worst mass murder.

In January, 2016, Reyat was given statutory release after serving two-thirds of his sentence, but still had the conditions that he must abide by.

Just Posted

Chemainus Fun Run participants spice up their lives

Inaugural Pumpkin Spice event adds a dash of excitement to sunny November day

Who was Chris Bloomfield, the Mill Bay man shot by police?

A troubled man with a voracious appetite for illicit drugs and a non-conventional lifestyle

BC Ferries passengers wait to leave Vancouver Island after Remembrance Day

Traffic aboard BC Ferries slows after Remembrance Day long weekend

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Vancouver Island remembers

Important stories shared as Islanders salute those who made the greatest sacrifice

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Student arrested at Vancouver Island elementary school

Pupils never in danger, incident unrelated to the school

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Most Read