Deer are involved in 80 per cent of animal-involved collisions in B.C. (Wikimedia Commons)

Drivers urged to be careful as B.C. enters worst month for deer collisions

Deer are involved in approximately 80 per cent of wildlife vehicle collisions

Drivers are being urged to watch out for deer on B.C.’s highways, as one of the worst months of the year for collisions begins.

The BC Conservation Foundation said November is one of the worst months of the year for deer collisions, along with May in the spring.

“Deer are involved in approximately 80 per cent of wildlife vehicle collisions,” a statement from the Wildlife Collision Prevention Program reads. Dusk and dawn are the worst times for these crashes.

ICBC statistics show there are about 9,900 animal collisions each year. Between 2013 and 2017, an average of three people a year die in these crashes.

The southern Interior is the worst for animal crashes, with 4,800 each year on average. The central northern regions of the province 2,700 annually, while Vancouver Island see 2,100 and the Lower Mainland sees 1,100.

ALSO READ: Deer blamed for North Okanagan motorcycle crash

ALSO READ: Herd of deer attack B.C. woman


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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