Concept 2 for the Crofton ferry terminal redevelopment. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Two concepts for Crofton ferry terminal presented to the public

BC Ferries meeting outlines the key features that will shape the long-term plan

The original four concept plans for the redevelopment of the Crofton ferry terminal have been narrowed down to two.

Interested residents got a look at the latest updated plans during a community drop-in information session Tuesday at the Crofton Community Centre.

In February, the terminal development team, along with staff from various other BC Ferries departments, began the process of creating a long-term plan for the Crofton terminal. They worked alongside community representatives on formulating the four preliminary concepts.

Further discussions were then held with the Municipality of North Cowichan, Catalyst Paper (now Paper Excellence), the Provincial Ministry of Transportation, Halalt First Nation and the Salt Spring Ferry Advisory Committee for refinements while taking community input into account.

“The culmination of those discussions have led to these two refined concepts,” explained Brian Green, BC Ferries terminal development manager.

Concept 1 includes: rebuilding the existing trestle to the ferry and making it wider; improved pedestrian accessibility; a dedicated pick-up/drop-off spot, long-term parking and expanded boat trailer parking off Chaplin Street; and a separation of local and ferry traffic along Chaplin while retaining the skate park at its current location.

Concept 2 includes: creating a new trestle and making the existing one a pedestrian pier; retaining and enhancing the current boat launch; an optional long-term parking lot off Chaplin Street; and a waterfront parking lot amid a pedestrian park and plaza.

Feedback was taken at the meeting, Green said, as well as looking at on-line engagement to refine the concepts further and develop a long-term master plan for the terminal.

“There might be some features of both that we can pull together,” he added.

“The key that’s driving this is that trestle needs to be replaced within the next four years.”

The present trestle needs to be larger or a new one built in a slightly different location.

The Crofton site presents a series of challenges and opportunities, unlike other terminals.

“It’s one of our few terminals that’s right in a town, if you like,” Green indicated.

“We don’t own any land in this area. We only own the trestle, essentially.

“Most of our terminals we do have long-term leases for more land than we have here.”

For those who couldn’t attend the meeting and are interested, the materials are now available on the BC Ferries website.

BC Ferries will prepare a summary from the spring and fall sessions, with a draft plan ready by early 2020.

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Community members discuss features of concept plans for the Crofton ferry terminal redevelopment with BC Ferries personnel. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Those attending the information session at the Crofton Community Centre placed dots on a map to signify what features they liked and didn’t like about each concept. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Brian Green, manager of terminal development for BC Ferries, looks over one of the element charts for the Crofton terminal. (Photo by Don Bodger)

BC Ferries’ Brian Green, right, and architect Jesse Garlick, middle, discuss plans with residents. (Photo by Don Bodger)

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