The Brookmans teach the art of fly-tying. From left are: Mike Waites, Devina Brookman, Denise Holloway and John Woods.  (Photo submitted)

The Brookmans teach the art of fly-tying. From left are: Mike Waites, Devina Brookman, Denise Holloway and John Woods. (Photo submitted)

Chemainus couple contributes its expertise through Duncan’s Elder College

Fly tying more of an art than meets the eye

No one is ever too old for learning. Elder College in Duncan offers a little something for everyone and there’s a unique Chemainus connection to the instructors list.

Devina and Ted Brookman, an enthusiastic Chemainus couple, teach the art of fly-tying through the Elder College and the Cowichan Valley Regional District to seniors (age 50 and older). They’re keen hobbyists and perhaps even keener fishermen and women. These human-made flies are usually colorful creations made from feathers, animal hair and synthetics.

It’s all about fooling a fish into eating what looks like a colorful insect but in reality is a disguised fish hook.

The Brookmans have been teaching fly-tying through the Elder College for more than 10 years from their home business studio on View Street in Chemainus. As volunteers with Elder College, they provide expertise on something they love.

All teachers at the Elder College donate their time – whether it’s about computers, smart phones, calligraphy, arm chair travel yoga or about 50 other programs starting each September and January.

Watching Devina Brookman teach the making of a fly, such as one aimed to hook a trout in Chemainus Lake, makes it look simple. That is, until you see each separate step taking place and then realize it really is an art.

That perfect snug knot with no loose ends is not as easy as you might think. The students in the current fly-tying course are amazingly enthusiastic and determined to learn how to make that perfect fly.

You can learn more about the Elder College by googling ‘Elder College, Duncan’ and watch for the flyer of events and programs in the CVRD.