Wind storm caused damage to Dylan Livingston and family’s carriage home and shop. (Photo by Dylan Livingston).

Weather extremes becoming the norm

People helping each other out makes our communities strong

There’s really no way to candy coat what’s been going on the last couple of weeks. It’s been brutal.

While our friends in other parts of the country endure winter snow, it’s the high winds and heavy rain causing major concern here. A fair amount of snow hit our region the last two years, but the trend has switched again with the real possibility of little snow at ground level in this area for the entire winter despite Tuesday’s little dusting in Chemainus, at least.

Remember this time when we get to the summer. It’s most likely going to be very dry for long periods of time again then and all this rain will be a faint memory.

The extremes in the seasons are certainly getting interesting and bound to change the way we live and adapt to conditions in the future. Even those who consider themselves the most intense skeptics are starting to believe in global warming.

The great thing about these crises, and we can definitely call it that because it’s such a departure from past norms, is how everyone pitches in to help others out.

Whether it’s a business, family members, neighbours or people who don’t even know each other, there’s a willingness to offer assistance that defines our communities.

That approach will serve us well in the event of a major disaster like an earthquake. What we’re experiencing now is only the tip of the iceberg compared to a situation like that, with not just the power in short supply, but basic necessities.

All we can do during these extreme weather events is continue to band together. Our collective strength is far superior to individuals toiling on their own.

It’s also a must to exercise caution when you’re out and about on the roadways. A mudslide last week that closed Highway 18 to Lake Cowichan is evidence of that.

Pooling water on the roads is a fallout of frequent rainfall and the effects shouldn’t be underestimated.

Anything can happen at any time and acting recklessly behind the wheel isn’t going to help yourself or anyone else.

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