We can’t just look at economics when considering municipal forest

We can’t just look at economics when considering municipal forest

It is a costly and foolish undertaking not to listen to what the Earth is telling us.

We can’t just look at economics when considering municipal forest

There is no doubt in my mind that in my lifetime, this past summer, watching the fire on Maple Mountain from my porch, this fall and winter with wind and rain storm, flooding, trees taking precious life and people’s protection of home and all the ensuing hardships, that these short months have been the most difficult weather yet to experience.

It is a costly and foolish undertaking not to listen to what the Earth is telling us. We must take up these challenges with new ideas and commitment. We, as a community, have 5,000 hectares of community forest — 12,355 acres of what could be our salvation.

Forest planning can no longer be thought of in an economic vacuum. Forest must be viewed, and decisions made within the complex interrelationship of life on this planet with an intention to improve health, from soil, water, frogs and fish all the way to human health. We can no longer afford to only consider economics. As individuals, within our community, we must make significant strides in this direction.

A previous writer to this newspaper is right. We have socks older than the number of years we have left to turn ourselves, our community, our environment around. This is not time for continuing the status quo. Before we can move ahead, we must slow down and reconsider where we want to go and the means with which we will get there. Let’s give our children and the children to come the gift of optimism. It is unprincipled to do otherwise. Pause.

Miyo Stevens

Cowichan Valley