Hybrids the path to real carbon reduction

Plug-in-hybrids, PHEV’s (hybrids use an engine and electric motor) have NONE of EV problems.

Hybrids the path to real carbon reduction

Hybrids the path to real carbon reduction

B.C. transport fuel consumption (six to seven billion litres per year) has remained steady over last 10 years, therefore there’s been NO carbon reduction.

Why? Because government’s “answer” to carbon reduction is electric vehicles that are too expensive, too small, too little range, too much daily attention, require public charge stations, and (never mentioned) additional power plants.

Plug-in-hybrids, PHEV’s (hybrids use an engine and electric motor) have NONE of EV problems. They run on fuel and electricity from a small battery charged by the engine or at home. The electric motor operates for starts, acceleration and limited distances. This means NO fuel used in cities, towns, intersections, therefore NO CO2, noise or NOx. Also means NO public charge stations and NO added power plant. PHEV’s fuel reduction is 60 to 90 per cent of IC vehicles, dependant on battery size and configuration. A PHEV burning 80 per cent less fuel means fuel consumption of two litres/100 km from average 10. This would bring B.C. fuel consumption down to 1.3 billion litres per year, saving nearly $8 billion a year — a lot of money. AND reduce CO2 by 80 per cent. Do so aggressively, in 12 years, as average vehicle age is just under 12.

Carbon tax revenue ($1.17 billion per year) is sufficient to rebate 180,000 NEW fuel efficient vehicles yearly (actual about 175,000) up to $13,000 each, average $6,500. Actual total vehicles rebated, under 6,000; over 1.5 million purchased. Total carbon tax revenue is in range of $6- $7 billion; less than $35 million spent on rebates. Why rebates? To encourage purchase of fuel efficient vehicles, but not with EVs.

Change the path to PHEVs…tomorrow!

Bob Conibear

Duncan