School buses have stop signs on the side for a reason. (Photo by Don Bodger)

School buses have stop signs on the side for a reason. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Brainless drivers ignoring bus lights, signs

Consequences still need to be harsher for offenses

When they gave out brains, you have to wonder how many people were at the back of the line.

In this day and age of constant messaging, the stupidity of some drivers pertaining to school buses is hard to fathom. How many times do the rules have to be repeated before they sink into minds that are clearly not functioning properly?

In case you missed it or know of some people who’ve never paid attention, be sure it’s clear drivers traveling in both directions must stop for a school bus when both the signal lights are activated and a stop sign pops out at the side of the bus. This could be in a school zone, but anywhere else that students are either picked up or dropped off.

The reason for both directions having to stop shouldn’t be a mystery because sometimes children will have to cross the road to get to their destination on the opposite side of the street.

It’s not rocket science, folks. How obvious does it need to be? In most cases, the stop will be a very brief one of mere seconds.

Incidents are still being reported around the region almost every day and there was another particularly concerning one recently where a driver blew through a bus stop sign on Osborne Bay Road outside of Crofton. The bus driver was even shouting ‘stop’ as the driver continued on his way.

Fortunately, someone got the license plate number and planned to report them. With dash cam video these days, it’s also great evidence to provide of offenders.

In B.C., the first offense for illegally passing school buses is $368. A second ticket will cost $668 and a third offense will run more than $1,000.

The provincial government in Prince Edward Island has decided to deal more harshly with those who fail to obey the rules. Drivers face losing their license for three months and a potential fine up to $5,000.

Perhaps it’s time for B.C. and other provinces to follow suit.

For those who continue to march (drive) to the beat of their own drum, is it potentially worth it?