A pipeline protests gathered in Vancouver Sunday, June 9. (Protect the Inlet)

Trans Mountain pipeline protestors rally in Vancouver

Ottawa has until June 18 to decide on pipeline’s fate

Pipeline protestors gathered in Vancouver Sunday to rally against the Trans Mountain pipeline.

Ottawa is expected to decide on final approval for the Edmonton to Burnaby pipeline on June 18.

The decision was originally due on May 23 but the feds said delaying the decision would give them more time to consult Indigenous groups.

READ MORE: Oil companies, 24-cent gap between B.C., Alberta to be focus of gas price probe

READ MORE: Trans Mountain stake should go to Indigenous owners on route, B.C. chief says

On the streets of Vancouver, protestors were vehement the project not go ahead.

“Building the Trans Mountain pipeline and tanker project would trespass on fundamental Indigenous rights in Canada, fuel the climate emergency fire and risk our coastal waters. One major spill could doom our Southern Resident killer whales and the salmon so many depend on,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs.

“Oil companies are making record profits and crying poverty. The economic case for this project collapsed with $120 a barrel crude oil prices. The boom is over and it’s not coming back – we must embrace a clean energy economy for our children and grandchildren, despite Justin Trudeau’s ongoing support to the dirty fossil fuel industry.”

The B.C. government has fought against the Trans mountain pipeline in court, but was dealt a blow in May after the B.C. Court of Appeal said the province’s attempt to create permits for companies that wished to increase their flow of diluted bitumen was unconstitutional.

READ MORE: Court says B.C. can’t restrict oil shipments in key case for Trans Mountain

READ MORE: More gasoline, less bitumen in Trans Mountain pipeline, B.C. premier urges Trudeau


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