RCMP seen landing by helicopter outside the Unist’ot’en camp on the Morice West Forest Service Road, south of Houston on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2019. Wet’suwet’en members and supporters have been blocking the access road for months in protest over the Coastal GasLink pipeline project. (Unist’ot’en Camp photo)

11 more arrested as RCMP continue to enforce injunction against Wet’suwet’en pipeline opponents

Mounties reached the last and final camp along the access road south of Houston Saturday

At least 11 people were arrested Saturday for allegedly barricading themselves in a warming centre along the only access road to a construction site for the contentious Coastal GasLink pipeline, which runs across Wet’suwet’en territory.

RCMP continued to enforce a court-ordered injunction against Wet’suwet’en members and their supporters protesting the pipeline in northern B.C. Saturday, as tensions remain high over the energy project.

Since Thursday, after talks broke down between Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and the province, police have been working their way along the Morice West Forest Service Road, just south of Houston. The route is the only access road leading to the project’s construction site.

ALSO READ: Coastal GasLink talks between Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, province break down

Officers dismantled two of three camps blocking access along the road on Friday.

According to organizers of the Unist’ot’en healing village – RCMP reached the third and final camp on Saturday morning. A 40-vehicle convoy of police was seen heading up the forestry road shortly after 9 a.m., Wet’suewe’ten members said on social media. A helicopter landed near the bridge in front of the camp shortly after 11 a.m., before leaving around 12:30 p.m.

It is unclear how many Wet’suwet’en land defenders are currently at that camp.

Six people were arrested Thursday, followed by another four on Friday. Further arrests are expected through the weekend.

The pipeline, part of the massive $40 billion LNG Canada liquefied natural gas export terminal project, runs from Dawson Creek to Kitimat on the northwest coast. The forestry road is part of an ongoing exclusion zone, which means that only police officers, hereditary chiefs or elected officials and media have been allowed through the checkpoint, which was first implemented at the 27-kilometre mark.

READ MORE: Six arrested as RCMP enforce court order on Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camps

WATCH: Four arrested in northern B.C. as RCMP continues to enforce pipeline court order

But RCMP said in a late-night update that the exclusion zone and checkpoint would be pushed back to the four-kilometre mark near the entrance of the forestry road. This came after the original access point was blockaded twice with one instance interfering with a police vehicle transporting arrested people.

“Several vehicles driven by RCMP personnel have been made inoperative after travelling past the 27-kilometre mark,” Mounties said.

“Later investigation has revealed that metal spikes were placed on the Forest Service Road, and these items were placed solely to cause damage to travelling vehicles.”

According to clan members, a number of people have refused to leave the 27-kilometre mark despite being told by police to vacate the area by 11 a.m. Saturday.

As tensions remain high along the rural northern B.C. road, the dispute has sparked a number of demonstrations across the country in solidarity with the First Nation. This includes a protest in southeastern Ontario which has forced the shutdown of passenger rail services since Friday morning.

In B.C., a number of demonstrators have been protesting RCMP actions by occupying the Legislature in Victoria for more than 24 hours. Another protest has shut down access to the Port of Vancouver.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coastal GasLink

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Chemainus District Chamber of Commerce supports business relationships

Strong tradition within local communities continues

Vancouver firm awarded contract for North Cowichan’s OCP project

Comprehensive review and update being undertaken

Vehicle and welding machines recovered from theft at Geo-Tech Industries

Suspects still not identified from early Tuesday morning break-in at Crofton business

For the love of dogs and cats

Here’s the top 15 from photos you sent in for Valentine’s Day

Pipeline dispute: Tories put no-confidence motion on House of Commons agenda

Conservatives say they have no confidence in the Trudeau government to end the rail blockades

Galchenyuk nets shootout winner as Wild edge Canucks 4-3

Vancouver tied with Calgary for second spot in NHL’s Pacific Division

Original Victoria Clipper vessel sails one last time

Vessel sold to buyers in Gabon, Central Africa

B.C.’s soda drink tax will help kids lose weight, improve health, says doctor

Dr. Tom Warshawski says studies show sugary drinks contribute to obesity

A&W employees in Ladysmith get all-inclusive vacation for 10 years of service

Kelly Frenchy, Katherine Aleck, and Muriel Jack are headed on all-expenses-paid vacations

B.C. mom’s complaint about ‘R word’ in children’s ministry email sparks review

In 2020, the ‘R’ word shouldn’t be used, Sue Robins says

Two new hybrid BC Ferries ships christened with new names in Victoria ceremony

Island Aurora and Island Discovery will service Gulf Island and North Island routes

B.C., federal ministers plead for meeting Wet’suwet’en dissidents

Scott Fraser, Carolyn Bennett says they can be in Smithers Thursday

Province shows no interest in proposed highway between Alberta and B.C.

Province says it will instead focus on expanding the Kicking Horse Canyon to four lanes

Most Read