The Municipality of North Cowichan expects cost savings with a new management structure, says CAO Ted Swabey. (File photo)

North Cowichan brings in new management structure to save money

Senior management reduced to four division heads plus CAO

The new council in North Cowichan will see savings at the municipality of about $150,000 a year thanks to a new management structure that’s now in place.

As of Oct. 12, the municipality has a smaller leadership team than in the past, comprised of just four general managers who will be in charge of four newly formed service divisions, each with three to five major service departments.

The divisions will consist of Financial and Protective Services, Community Services, Development and Engineering Services and People and Business Services.

According to a press release, these four divisions combine connected services together in an effort to streamline the customer service experience, reduce administrative delays associated with cross-departmental approvals and coordination, “and promote a more adaptive, responsive and accountable North Cowichan”.

The new structure will also result in long-term salary savings at the senior leadership level, forecast at approximately $150,000 per year, realized through a reduction in senior leadership positions through retirements, voluntary resignations and other means.

It’s hoped the new structure will also realize further long-term opportunities for cost savings and improved productivity due to ongoing work to streamline service delivery within and across the divisions.

RELATED STORY: NORTH COWICHAN PROJECTS A 2.64 PER CENT TAX INCREASE IN 2018

“The structure and culture at North Cowichan needed to change in order to effectively meet the expectations of the community and council we serve,” said North Cowichan’s CAO Ted Swabey.

“The pressures and expectations on our organization, and all local governments, have shifted dramatically over time and the structure and culture that worked in the past is no longer effective. We must adapt and modernize.”

The general manager of Development and Engineering Services will be recruited externally, while the former director of parks, forestry and recreation, Ernie Mansueti, has been appointed to the role of general manager of Community Services.

Former director of financial services Mark Frame has been appointed to the role of general manager of Financial and Protective Services, and former director of human resources Sarah Nixon has been appointed to the role of general manager of People and Business Services.

All general managers will report directly to Swabey.

“This is the first time I can remember an organizational review being conducted at North Cowichan,” said Mayor Jon Lefebure.

“It’s always positive to have a set of fresh eyes assess the organization.”



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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