Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Ahmad Naveed, a mechanical engineer from Nanaimo, has created Nanaimo Thief Tracking, an online application that allows anyone to plot locations and share details about thefts. (CHRIS BUSH/The News Bulletin)
Nanaimo Thief Tracking allows anyone to plot locations and share information about thefts online. (Nanaimo Thief Tracking image)
Ahmad Naveed, a mechanical engineer from Nanaimo, has created Nanaimo Thief Tracking, an online application that allows anyone to plot locations and share details about thefts. So far, the application has helped a stolen patio heater be returned to its owner. (CHRIS BUSH/The News Bulletin)

A recent graduate from the University of British Columbia’s mechanical engineering program with a little spare time on his hands has devised a way to keep track of local thievery.

Ahmad Naveed, who is currently living in Nanaimo, has created Nanaimo Thief Tracking, an app that allows anyone aware of a theft to share the details and plot the location online.

Naveed, who is currently doing contract work from his family’s home, said the idea for the program was sparked by the frequency of theft in Nanaimo.

“I just noticed there was a bit of an epidemic out there and people were complaining about how they were affected by the local thieving,” Naveed said. “I thought it would be cool to have an app that people can submit their own information on in a little map with a time stamp, so that people around there can realize what’s happening and be more careful.”

People can pull up a map of Nanaimo on the application’s web page, click on the symbols of thefts plotted on the map, which calls up the details of the theft, including time, items taken and their descriptions and other information the poster shared. The shared information can be used by others to keep an eye out for stolen property. In one instance the theft of a patio heater, stolen from a restaurant in a shopping plaza, that was shared on Nanaimo Thief Tracking, resulted in it being found a short time later when another user of the app came across it beside the E&N Trail and posted that information.

READ ALSO: Crime incidents on the rise in Nanaimo

Naveed said his home computer is acting as the online server for the program, which took him between 20 and 30 hours to write. He learned coding while studying robotics, which requires engineers to learn the skill.

“In this day and age all engineers have to have some software experience,” he said.

The app is free to use and anyone who wants to share information about a theft or learn more about where others have been happening can do so by visiting www.nanaimothieftracking.tk:3001/.

READ ALSO: Crime on the rise in north Nanaimo

READ ALSO: Business community reports to city council on impacts of social disorder in Nanaimo



photos@nanaimobulletin.com
Like us on
Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Successful end to search for kayakers along the Chemainus River

Father and son located tired and cold, but otherwise OK

Big red Antique Barn on the highway in Chemainus garnering attention

New owner emphasizes more vintage items and collectibles to attract younger people

Province needs to do something to end WFP strike

Passivity on the issue causing hardship to many workers who elected Premier into office

Wild winter weather week in the Chemainus Valley

Stats and expert analysis on a snowy and cold few days

Four things ‘not’ to do if you run into Prince Harry and Meghan in B.C.

Here is a list of some things you definitely should NOT do, according to the BBC

B.C. RCMP spent roughly $750K on massive manhunt for Port Alberni men

Manitoba RCMP helped with 17-day search through the province’s northern terrain

Future space homes could be made of mushrooms

NASA explores use of fungi to build structures in space

Island Bakery in Cobble Hill to close

Cobble Hill store in business since 1982

Man killed by police in Lytton called 911, asking to be shot: RCMP

Howard Schantz, also known as Barry Schantz was killed following a standoff at his Lytton home

Canadian public health agencies ramping up preparations in response to new virus

Health officials have said there are no confirmed cases of the emerging coronavirus in Canada

‘Naughty boy’: Monty Python star Terry Jones dies at 77

The comedian has been suffering from a rare form of dementia

Vancouver Island man arrested after police seize suspected illicit drugs in Nanoose Bay

Car impounded after Port Alberni driver clocked travelling at more than twice the posted speed limit

Most Read