Fisheries and Oceans Canada officials and members of the B.C. Wildfire Service move salmon in a temporary holding pen on the Fraser River before being transported with a helicopter past a massive rock slide, near Big Bar, west of Clinton, B.C., on Wednesday July 24, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

‘Extensive’ work planned at Big Bar landslide ahead of salmon, steelhead migration

Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan visited the site of the slide from June

The federal minister in charge of overseeing Canada’s fisheries and oceans says that “extensive” remediation efforts are continuing at the the site of a large landslide that cut off salmon from migrating along the Fraser River.

It’s been about seven months since the Big Bar landslide first happened, roughly 64 kilometres north of Lillooet. Fisheries and Oceans Canada staff, alongside local First Nations, tirelessly worked to free the fish trapped behind the slide.

In November, the federal government issued a public request to seek a contractor to remove the block and re-establish a natural fish passage through the winter months. Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan visited the site Saturday and announced that Peter Kiewit Sons ULC has been selected to take on the remediation work for $17.6 million.

ALSO READ: First Nations want Big Bar landslide cleared ASAP to allow fish passage

“We know how integral these salmon stocks are to our ecosystem and to the communities up and down the Fraser River,” Jordan said in a statement, adding that officials are moving swiftly with the next phase of response.

Work to create a new passage will begin immediately, until mid-to-late March and by the upcoming migration season.

WATCH: Drone footage documents work to free salmon at Big Bar landslide

In addition to the contract, the minister also announced two technical working groups that will help inform the remediation plans, madeup of non-profit organizations, academics, government officials and stakeholders. The groups will help plan additional options in case the height or water velocity disallows certain salmon populations to get through the stretch of river following the spring freshet.

Here’s a timeline of the response following the slide:


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

More events hit by COVID’s wrath

Tour de Rock doesn’t pack the same punch for obvious reasons

United Church benefits from goodwill of Magpies business owners

Considerable donation of items made after move from former Willow Street shop

Recognizing exceptional professionalism on World Teachers’ Day

COVID has brought an unprecedented change to the education system

B.C. salmon farms challenge activists’ demands for site closures

News reporting also unfair, inaccurate and distorted

Blitterswyk awarded another significant scholarship

The honours just keep coming for Chemainus Secondary School 2020 grad class valedictorian

B.C. counts 125 new COVID-19 cases, up to 1,284 active

No new deaths or health care facility outbreaks

Lessons from a pandemic: How to design a nursing home that’s safe and love-filled

A look at how one care home is battling the pandemic with the social needs of the elderly in their care

B.C. salmon farm opponents demand answers from DFO

First Nations, conservation groups dismayed by omission of sea lice in risk assessments

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Health Canada green-lights rapid COVID-19 test

Health Canada approved the BCube test from Hyris Ltd. in the United Kingdom Sept. 23

First Nations Health Authority chief medical officer concerned with rising COVID-19 cases

“There’s still so much we don’t know and we’re learning everyday about this particular virus.”

FINLAYSON: COVID-related job losses concentrated in urban areas… especially Metro Vancouver

The biggest job losses, in absolute terms, have been in Metro Vancouver

Most Read