Court asked to review limits on B.C. conservation officers’ power to kill wildlife

The case stems from when a bear cub was put down in 2016

An animal advocacy group is asking the country’s top court to review a previous ruling that found B.C. conservation officers have the “unlimited authority” to kill wildlife.

The group, known as the Fur-Bearers, filed their application for leave to appeal in the Supreme Court of Canada on Monday, following the B.C. Supreme Court’s dismissal of a similar lawsuit late last year.

According to the B.C.-based group, a conservation officer euthanized a black bear cub near Dawson Creek in 2016, even though staff at a wildlife centre in Smithers had agreed to take it in.

The group argues the cub was “vulnerable [and] orphaned” and posed no danger to anyone.

Last year, the B.C. Supreme Court judge said it was “inconceivable” that lawmakers meant to prevent conservation officers’ powers to killing animals that are “at large and are likely to harm.”

The group said it was worried officers would kill animals in circumstances most people would find “inappropriate, and even immoral.”

Executive director Lesley Fox questioned why the officers do not have an external or third-party review. The 2016 case was reviewed twice internally, the group said, with both reviews supporting the decision to kill the bear cub.

“We believe that conservation officers, who are law enforcement agents and not wildlife experts or rehabilitators, should not be the only ones determining whether an animal should be sent to rehabilitation for care and release, or killed,” said Fox.

“Canadians see animals as sentient beings that must be treated with compassion and in accordance with shared values.”


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Camp Yellow Dog provides a structured home away from home

Pampered pooches enjoy the royal retreatment, but keep active, too

One piper piping during the pandemic

Tribute to health care workers reaches the 100th performance

Grads’ gratification goes beyond words for prom

Thankful Chemainus Secondary class enjoys a celebratory evening

Symphony pop-up concerts coming to Saltair

Only 40 tickets available so get them soon if you’re interested

Board of Education moves district closure week to March 22-26

Change aligns Cowichan Valley School District dates with others around the province

The pandemic is widening Canada’s workplace gender gap

Gender pay gap is incentivizing fathers to work while mothers watch children, a new B.C. study has found

Man found dead on Okanagan trail identified as Hollywood actor

GoFundMe campaign launched for man found dead at summit of Spion Kop

3 people dead in Prince George motel fire

Fire personnel believe the blaze was suspicious although investigation in early stages

B.C. sets terms to review police, mental health, race relations

MLAs to recommend Police Act changes by May 2021

Feds announce $8.3M to deal with ‘ghost’ fishing gear in B.C. waters

Ghost gear accounts for up to 70 per cent of all macro-plastics in the ocean by weight

Almost 99% less land in B.C. burned this year compared to 2018

2018 was the worst year on record for wildfires

B.C. orders Coastal GasLink to stop pipeline construction near protected wetlands

The 670-kilometre pipeline is planned to transport natural gas from northeast B.C. to Kitimat

B.C. tent camps persist as hotels, housing bought for homeless

Current estimate 40 camps, homeless counts stalled by COVID-19

Most Read