A fuel surcharge is being imposed by BC Ferries, due to rising fuel costs. (Peninsula News Review File)

BC Ferries adds fuel surcharge

On average fares to rise 1.5 per cent on most routes starting June 1

BC Ferries say they are imposing a modest surcharge on fares to cover rising fuel costs.

On June 1, the company will add a surcharge of 1.5 per cent, which works out at 25 cents for an adult and 85 cents for a vehicle on the Metro Vancouver – Vancouver Island routes, and 15 cents for an adult and 45 cents for a vehicle on a variety of inter-islands routes.

ALSO READ: BC Ferries announce extra sailings for May long-weekend

Over the past 15 years, BC Ferries has been using a fuel rebate/surcharge mechanism to manage the volatility in the price of fuel. When fuel prices are lower, BC Ferries say they pass lower fuel prices on to customers through a fuel rebate. When fuel prices are higher, they charge a fuel surcharge specifically to cover the additional cost of fuel. The company says there have been periods with neither and they do not benefit financially from surcharges or rebates.

“We now have five vessels operating on liquefied natural gas, a cleaner and less expensive fuel source than the ultra-low sulphur diesel we use for our other vessels. LNG is approximately 50 per cent less expensive than diesel, and its use result in fuel savings that are passed on to our customers,” said Mark Collins, BC Ferries’ president and CEO. “Despite fuel switching and other initiatives to burn fuel more efficiently, a fuel surcharge is now necessary. Fuel is our second largest expense. We know that the affordability of travel is important to our customers, and we will continue to take measures to reduce our fuel consumption further through the introduction of diesel electric battery hybrid vessels.”

ALSO READ: BC Ferries launches summer discount promotion

The fuel surcharge will be, on average, 1.5 per cent on all routes with the exception of the Port Hardy – Prince Rupert, Prince Rupert – Haida Gwaii and Port Hardy – Central Coast routes. These routes have a separate fuel-cost mechanism and they will escape a fuel surcharge, at this time.

For more information visit bcferries.com.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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