health tips

5 tips to keep trick-or-treaters safe this Halloween

BC Children’s Hospital has a few suggestions to keep Oct. 31 fun

With Halloween fast approaching, BC Children’s Hospital is offering some tips to keep trick-or-treaters safe as they run door-to-door collecting candy on Oct.31.

Drivers, slow down:

Crashes spike by 25 per cent on Halloween, according to ICBC. More children will be on the streets and sidewalks in the evening — many of them distracted by the night’s festivities. Drivers are urged to slow down, drive safely and not drink and drive.

Keep costumes hazard-free:

While many kids love wearing masks and costumes with intricate accessories, these items can actually become barriers when spotting cars and other hazards. Try swapping out the mask for face paint. Also, ensure dresses and capes are short enough so kids avoid falling.

Stick together:

Kids should be accompanied by adults at all times. Hard to keep track of which are yours? Try dressing up in group-themed costumes.

Stay bright:

The brighter and more colourful the costume, the better. That could include attaching reflective tape, buttons and lights to kids’ coats and goody bags – anything that makes it easier for drivers to see them as they cross the street. Carrying a flashlight is also a good idea.

Follow the yellow-brick road:

Draw a trick-or-treat map with your kids and ensure everyone sticks to the route. Discuss a plan with older children so you know where they are at all times, which could involve using a cell phone.

Check candy:

Adults should check all treats be wary of unsealed or broken wrappers and unwrapped candies. If you’re not sure, simply throw it out.

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