Strike taking a toll on families of WFP workers with Christmas approaching

Donations being sought at the union hall in Duncan to provide assistance

The United Steelworkers Local 1-1937 strike at Western Forest Products mills – including the Chemainus sawmill – has passed the five-month mark with no end in sight and workers, especially those with young families, are feeling the pinch with Christmas fast approaching.

A food drive was held Saturday at the union office at 351 Brae Rd. in Duncan to provide a helping hand.

Crofton’s Shannon Carlow and Melanie Cinkant of Ladysmith started talking when they crossed paths at the Christmas Chaos craft fair in Duncan during mid-November and are taking the initiative to assist the WFP employees who are taking a huge financial hit from the long duration of the strike.

North Island workers have received tremendous support from their communites and that got Cinkant into action mode for workers in the Chemainus, Saltair, Ladysmith and Nanaimo zones.

“I couldn’t sit here and hope for the best,” she said. “I’ve got to do my fair share.

“I was reading on the internet for the same kind of fundraising group that was doing something like that for our central area here. There was a lot of little things going on.”

The WFP strike almost seemed lost in the shuffle with the news media focused on many other labour disputes that were running simultaneously around the province, including the transit situation in Vancouver, Saanich CUPE workers, CN Rail and more gaining a higher profile.

Through what Cinkant described as “typical female word of mouth,” she sprung into action.

After talking to striking families at Christmas Chaos and educating some people who seemed unaware there was a strike going on, “that’s when I got a confidential email from someone nominating a family,” Cinkant explained.

Carlow and Cinkant have been busy ever since identifying the greatest needs and publicizing donation information.

“She messaged me literally the day after Christmas Chaos,” said Cinkant. “We had a game plan and we’ve literally talked every day since. We just need some kind hearts right now. We’re just hoping to make a change.

“We’re trying to help families. There’s so many families it’s hard to pinpoint one or two. Everyone’s been affected by this. Most of us, this is our second or third strike. The younger generation, this is their first.”

Donations of food, but even things like hockey gear have been coming in.

“There’s people who can’t pay their Hydro,” noted Cinkant. “We’re all suffering on different ways. It’s not necessarily no food in the fridge. Businesses and banks, they’re all willing to work with you. After four months, there’s nothing (they) can do for you.”

The strike isn’t going to end next week, Cinkant conceded, so long-term contingency plans need to be made.

The food drive was most helpful in getting things going in a big way. Right now, the union office in Duncan is the primary location for contributions, but more localized donation spots could be set up.

Gift certificates to grocery stores are most welcomed, but not cheques since the processing time involved won’t be of any benefit before Christmas. Cash donations, of course, are preferable to cheques.

Children’s toys can also be dropped off at the hall.

The families hardest hit have been identified, but no information is being unveiled that will identify them publicly. They will be given top priority from the donations made.

For those who’d like their donations to go to the four families hardest hit, clearly mark it as “Melanie and Shannon”, Carlow added, and it will then be set aside for that purpose. The families reside in Chemainus, and Ladysmith/Saltair.

“I love how the most generous people are those with the least,” noted Carlow.

She indicated she normally uses the money she’d spend on Christmas gifts to buy anonymously for kids and seniors, putting the names of her family or friends on the gift tags as the giver.

This year, Carlow’s taking that money and providing it to a member of WFP in Chemainus who is on strike.

People have been going the extra mile to do everything possible so far, even going so far as to provide cords of wood for the fire at the Chemainus picket line.

Just Posted

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Tipping fees for garbage increasing at regional recycling centres in 2020

Recyclable materials make up nearly half of what’s sent to the landfill

South Cowichan Community Policing helps district bus riders

Two incidents a day on average since Nov. 8 far too many

Hungry horde of seniors gobble up Christmas turkey in Crofton

It’s a tradition as strong as Christmas itself in Crofton. For more… Continue reading

Support for strikers keeping the faith

Donations making a difference as labour dispute drags on

VIDEO: Success of wildlife corridors in Banff National Park has advocates wanting more

Demand for more highway protection escalated after seven elk were killed by a semi-trailer near Canmore

Pacioretty scores 2, Golden Knights top Canucks 6-3

Vegas goalie Fleury gets win No. 452

B.C. VIEWS: Hunger does not end with the season

Despite innovations in food distribution, the need is still there in B.C. communities

Fans sing Canadian anthem after sound system breaks at BMW IBSF World Cup

The Canadians in attendance made sure their team and flag were honoured on the podium

VIDEO: Fire destroys Big White Ski Resort chalet

Social media eulogies peg the property, nicknamed “The Pharamacy,” as both loved and hated

Prince George RCMP use bait packages to catch porch pirates over the holidays

First-in-Canada program with Amazon looks to combat parcel theft

Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Nanaimo Thief Tracking lets users plot and share information about thefts online

Mayor wants B.C. to institutionalize severely mental ill people who are homeless

Those suffering from mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, need specialized care, mayor says

Most Read