The Chemainus Cenotaph service for Remembrance Day won’t be open to the public this year due to COVID-19. Royal Canadian Legion 191 Chemainus members will still be having an invite-only ceremony to mark the occasion. From left are: Mike Beggs, Wes Everitt, Janet Mitchell and president Len Lavender. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The Chemainus Cenotaph service for Remembrance Day won’t be open to the public this year due to COVID-19. Royal Canadian Legion 191 Chemainus members will still be having an invite-only ceremony to mark the occasion. From left are: Mike Beggs, Wes Everitt, Janet Mitchell and president Len Lavender. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Remembrance Day ceremony a private service this year

Pandemic restrictions limit the crowd to 50 invited guests

People seem anxious to show their support for veterans and to honour those who made the ultimate sacrifices for our freedom, but COVID-19 knows no bounds.

As a result of restrictions necessitated by the pandemic, there won’t be a public ceremony on Remembrance Day at the Chemainus Cenotaph next Wednesday, Nov. 11. Instead, there will be a private ceremony limited to 50 invited people.

“There will be no walk-up and no parade,” said Janet Mitchell, Chemainus Legion 191 treasurer.

“There’ll be no seating, no chairs, no cadets,” added the Legion’s Wes Everitt.

In other words, it’ll be nothing like the usual and residents are certain to be feeling a little blue at missing the ceremony, especially since there’s been such a strong turnout during the last few years, in particular. But the local Legion doesn’t make the rules, a point Mitchell stressed.

“All health care protocols are enforced for COVID-19. We have trouble at the branch, people think they’re our rules.”

There’s no flexibility for provincial health orders due to the rising number of cases. The measures will be felt the most in large centres where the huge gatherings commonly seen won’t be happening.

“It’s across the country,” Legion 191 president Len Lavender reinforced.

Nothing can be done about the limited numbers.

“Even if they’re members coming in, they can’t bring in guests,” Everitt indicated. “It can only be their spouse or partner.”

“As an aside, we are going to have perimeter control,” noted Mitchell.

Legion members in Chemainus are suggesting an alternative for citizens. “Please can you stand on your doorstep at 11 a.m. and observe two minutes of silence,” urged Mitchell.

The Nov. 8 service at the Chemainus Cemetery is also private this year, limited to 50 people with social distancing and masks required.

Meanwhile, the desire to support the Legion’s Poppy Fund seems stronger than ever this year. The Poppy Fund supports veterans’ needs, the National Poster and Literary contest, the purchase of medical equipment and other approved donations in the community. The campaign in Chemainus started Oct. 30 and runs right through to Nov. 11.

“Volunteers have been out canvassing businesses for donations and wreath purchases,” noted Mitchell.

The wreaths will all be pre-placed at the cenotaph, rather than during the Remembrance Day ceremony.

The 49th Parallel Grocery in Chemainus and the Chemainus Public Market are the only places where personnel will be handling the poppies, but donation boxes have also been placed at numerous businesses around town.

“I think people have been very generous this year,” observed Mitchell.

CoronavirusRemembrance DayVeterans

 

David Goatley’s mural in downtown Chemainus is very poignant and pertinent as Remembrance Day approaches. (Photo by Don Bodger)

David Goatley’s mural in downtown Chemainus is very poignant and pertinent as Remembrance Day approaches. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Just Posted

Black Press file photo
RCMP seek suspect in Vancouver Island-wide crime spree

Crimes stretched from Deep Bay to Qualicum, Ladysmith, Chemainus and Youbou

North Cowichan’s committee of the whole have rejected staff’s recommendation to limit the use of fireworks to Halloween. (File photo)
North Cowichan rejects limiting fireworks to Halloween

Municipality decides staff recommendation would be unpopular

Flag exhibit is now set up in the Chemainus Valley Museum. (Photo by Val Galvin)
Fibre artists put their unique twists on climate change exhibit

Red Flag warning label affixed to collection now on display at the Chemainus Valley Museum

Things are looking up for Vancouver Island as zero COVID-19 cases have been reported for the first time since October. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Island records zero new COVID-19 cases for the first time since October

For the first time since October, the province is reporting zero new… Continue reading

Letters to the editor.
Many questions emerge from opioid dealer’s sentence

Leniency hard to fathom, especially after judge’s harsh words

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

Emily Steele holds up a collage of her son, 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard who was stabbed and killed in June 2019, outside of Kelowna Law Courts on June 18. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Kelowna woman who fatally stabbed teen facing up to 1.5 years of jail time

Her jail sentence would be followed by an additional one to 1.5 years of supervision

Cpl. Scott MacLeod and Police Service Dog Jago. Jago was killed in the line of duty on Thursday, June 17. (RCMP)
Abbotsford police, RCMP grieve 4-year-old service dog killed in line of duty

Jago killed by armed suspect during ‘high-risk’ incident in Alberta

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The George Road wildfire near Lytton, B.C., has grown to 250 hectares. (BC Wildfire Service)
B.C. drone sighting halts helicopters fighting 250 hectares of wildfire

‘If a drone collides with firefighting aircraft the consequences could be deadly,’ says BC Wildfire Service

A dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a vaccination site in Vancouver Thursday, March 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
NACI advice to mix vaccines gets varied reaction from AstraZeneca double-dosers

NACI recommends an mRNA vaccine for all Canadians receiving a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

A aerial view shows the debris going into Quesnel Lake caused by a tailings pond breach near the town of Likely, B.C., Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Updated tailings code after Mount Polley an improvement: B.C. mines auditor

British Columbia’s chief auditor of mines has found changes to the province’s requirements for tailings storage facilities

A North Vancouver man was arrested Friday and three police officers were injured after a 10-person broke out at English Bay on June 19, 2021. (Youtube/Screen grab)
Man arrested, 3 police injured during 10-person brawl at Vancouver beach

The arrest was captured on video by bystanders, many of whom heckled the officers as they struggled with the handcuffed man

Most Read