The view along snowy Oak Street in Chemainus. (Photo by Elisabeth Gelb)

The view along snowy Oak Street in Chemainus. (Photo by Elisabeth Gelb)

Considerable reminders remain from last week’s heavy snowfall

Nearly a foot of snow taking a while to melt down

Nearly a foot of snow fell in the Chemainus area during last week’s storm.

“Most of the snow fell from the afternoon of Jan. 5 to near daybreak Jan. 6,” noted Chris Carss, a weather recorder for Environment and Climate Change Canada at his Chemainus home.

The exact total came out to 29.6 centimetres that works out to 11.65 inches. Carss noted there was already 10 cm on the ground when the storm started.

“After the snowfall ended, there was a total of 37 cm on the ground, but that melted down to 10 cm by the afternoon of Jan. 7.

“The source of the weather was an atmospheric river that came up from Hawaii of all places; definitely not a pineapple express this time!”

Temperatures ensured the precipitation fell as snow instead of rain.

However, there’s been another change this week with another atmospheric river coming in that’s expected to produce significant rainfall again.

Severe weatherSnow

 

A collage pf photos from a white and wondrous morning on Thetis Island. “We are building snow stamina here on the usually WetCoast,” says Kelly Bannister. (Photo by Kelly Bannister)

A collage pf photos from a white and wondrous morning on Thetis Island. “We are building snow stamina here on the usually WetCoast,” says Kelly Bannister. (Photo by Kelly Bannister)

Guard dog Bowser plunks down in the snow. (Photo by Denise Reich)

Guard dog Bowser plunks down in the snow. (Photo by Denise Reich)

Slurpy snow on salt water. “I don’t recall ever seeing that before,” noted Donna Brown of Penelakut Island. “Could this become the norm now? Super hot summers and super cold winters. Time will tell. (Photo by Donna Brown)

Slurpy snow on salt water. “I don’t recall ever seeing that before,” noted Donna Brown of Penelakut Island. “Could this become the norm now? Super hot summers and super cold winters. Time will tell. (Photo by Donna Brown)

Snow pile takes on glacier-like qualities with its blue hue. (Photo by Kelly Bannister)

Snow pile takes on glacier-like qualities with its blue hue. (Photo by Kelly Bannister)

Beautiful snowy scene on Penelakut Island. (Photo by Rocky James)

Beautiful snowy scene on Penelakut Island. (Photo by Rocky James)

Susan Margetts’ Whoville tree in Saltair. (Photo by Susan Margetts)

Susan Margetts’ Whoville tree in Saltair. (Photo by Susan Margetts)