When did you last sit and read a newspaper? National Newspaper Week is Oct. 1-7. (Wiki Commons)

When did you last sit and read a newspaper? National Newspaper Week is Oct. 1-7. (Wiki Commons)

Celebrate National Newspaper Week #NowMoreThanEver

Oct. 1-7 marks annual observance of printed news media

How does that joke go – what’s black and white and red (read) all over? A newspaper.

This week marks National Newspaper Week in Canada, where today there are roughly 100 daily newspapers and more than 1,000 community newspapers.

The very first printing presses in Canada were in Halifax, Quebec City and Montreal in what is now Canada, the first official newspaper was the Halifax Gazette, whose two-page first edition hit the streets March 23, 1752.

Newspapers have seen some significant changes in the last decade, jumping off the page, and onto our screens, so to speak.

This year, the theme of the week is the hashtag #NowMoreThanEver, calling your attention to the important role newspapers continue to play in a democratic society.

Oh, and it’s an election year.

So, consider opening that box on the corner of the street you walk by daily, and grab some of that paper stuff you see inside. A lot of people are hard at work making sure it’s an informative, creative, interesting, thought-provoking piece of work, worth your time.

As writer Arthur Miller once mused, “A good newspaper, I suppose, is a nation talking to itself.”