Chemainus Communities In Bloom.

Water conservation important during these dry conditions

Communities in Bloom looking for more help with weeding sessions

Summer drought has arrived. It is time to start to take steps to save water during our rainy seasons. Would the Municipality of North Cowichan be interested in providing rain barrels to its residents? Conserving water is becoming more and more important. The golden lawns are a positive sign that watering restrictions are being followed.

Autumn follows summer, winter follows autumn and drought follows planting.

Weeding sessions are going well but we are still looking for new faces – come and join us. Call Diane at 250-210-0396 if you are interested.

WE DIG – DO IT NOW TIPS

• Keep deadheading

• Keep baskets and planters well fed, watered and deadheaded

• Fertilize broccoli and cucumbers

• Keep water from shrub leaves while hot sun is out

• Divide iris

• Prune climbing roses and fertilize with fish fertilizer spray

• Trim evergreen hedges, including laurel

• Trim conifers to maintain shape

• To toughen trees, shrubs and perennials for winter, stop fertilizing

• Remove finished annuals, such as nemesia and schizanthus

• When cane plants such as raspberries are finished, cut the old canes to the ground

• For winter harvesting, plant kale, broccoli, kohlrabi, spinach and Brussels sprouts

• Brush the soil away from the tops of onions to assist in maturity

• Cut back stems of pumpkins and trailing winter squash. Make the cut just above the leaf growing beyond the last formed fruit

DID YOU KNOW

… that the flower of the month is the Gladiola, meaning give me a break?

… VanGogh loved sunflowers and painted 11 paintings of the cheery flowers?

… August 11 marks the end of the dog days of summer which began on July 3?

… August 1 to 7 is International Clown Week?

… August 17 is World Honey Bee Day?

PICK OF THE MONTH

Cleome, commonly known as spider flowers or bee plants. The flower head is spiky and has a spidery appearance and comes in pink, purple, white and red. They bloom from early summer to first frost. They range in height from 1 ½ to 5 feet and 1 to 2 feet spread. Native to South America. They like average well drained soil and full sun.

AND …

A toddler was found chewing on a slug. After the initial surge of disgust, the parents said, “well, what does it taste like?” “Worms” was the reply.

Communities in Bloom meeting: Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. upstairs in the Chemainus Legion Hall. New faces always welcome.

Visit our blog at www.wedigchemainus.ca

Commmunitygardening