A spirited performance by the Tzinqwa Singers as well as Stz’uminus Song and Dance had the audience captivated. (Photo by Daphne Carlyle)

A spirited performance by the Tzinqwa Singers as well as Stz’uminus Song and Dance had the audience captivated. (Photo by Daphne Carlyle)

Prominent program for National Indigenous Peoples Day

Chemainus schedule includes speeches, entertainment, a park opening and book signing

Celebration and reflection marked National Indigenous Peoples Day in Chemainus Tuesday.

A great crowd turned out, primarily centred around the Waterwheel Park stage, for an afternoon program of speeches, ceremonial song and dance and musical performances.

A light rain only slightly interrupted the proceedings, forcing audience members to put up the umbrellas or take cover under the large trees on the site.

Opening speeches were followed by a jam-packed program featuring the Tzinqwa Singers, Stz’uminus Song and Dance, popular Ed Peekeekoot of Crofton, the Mitchell sisters, Cactus Cadillacs and Keanu Ienco.

The day also included the official opening of Wul’aam Park. Coast Salish elder Florence James of Penelakut Island gave a special prayer in Hul’q’umi’num and blessed the trail.

Signage includes trail names and descriptions developed with Penelakut School students and Penelakut elders, written in Hul’q’umi’num. Wul’aam Park means echo in Hul’q’umi’num, which was the original name given to the dedicated park space.

Raymond Tony Charlie appeared outside the Chemainus Valley Museum to sign copies of his book, In The Shadow of the Red Brick Building.

And, yes, there was food, too, to make the day complete.

CelebrationIndigenous Peoples Day

 

John James added his trademark sense of humour to the proceedings on the mike. (Photo by Don Bodger)

John James added his trademark sense of humour to the proceedings on the mike. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Val Bob provides some commentary on the day. She heads the Chemainus Valley Cultural Arts Society’s First Nations committee. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Val Bob provides some commentary on the day. She heads the Chemainus Valley Cultural Arts Society’s First Nations committee. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Author Raymond Tony Charlie outside the Chemainus Valley Museum to sign copies of his book, In The Shadow of the Red Brick Building. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Author Raymond Tony Charlie outside the Chemainus Valley Museum to sign copies of his book, In The Shadow of the Red Brick Building. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The always-entertaining Ed Peekeekoot on the guitar. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The always-entertaining Ed Peekeekoot on the guitar. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The always-entertaining Ed Peekeekoot on the guitar. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The always-entertaining Ed Peekeekoot on the guitar. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Ed Peekeekoot plays the Native American flute. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Ed Peekeekoot plays the Native American flute. (Photo by Don Bodger)