Premier John Horgan takes questions outside his office at the B.C. legislature Thursday, April 12, 2018. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

John Horgan braces for Ottawa meeting with Rachel Notley

Invest in refineries, not Trans Mountain pipeline, B.C. Premier says

As he prepares to fly to Ottawa for a meeting on the escalating pipeline dispute, B.C. Premier John Horgan has some advice for Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

“I’ve heard speculation that the federal government and the provincial government in Alberta may invest in the pipeline,” Horgan said Thursday. “If they have disposable billions, I would suggest a better course of action would be to invest in refining capacity so that we Canadians can benefit from the jobs, and we Canadians can benefit from this natural resource, rather than sending it in raw form to another jurisdiction.”

Infuriated over Horgan’s efforts to stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion despite approval by both B.C. and Ottawa, Notley has said her government would invest in the twinning project or even take it over to make sure it gets built.

Trudeau has invited both premiers to Ottawa on Sunday, interrupting his tour of South America and Europe to try to resolve the bitter dispute between two NDP provincial governments.

RELATED: New spill response bases on hold

Horgan said Thursday he intends to continue preparing a reference case for court on whether B.C. has jurisdiction to influence the pipeline project. He stuck to that position after B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman admitted in the legislature earlier this week that the government’s legal advice is B.C. has no jurisdiction.

Tim McMillan, president of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, said in an interview Thursday that he has no particular problem with governments investing in oil and gas projects. But the problem here is B.C.’s obstruction of a duly approved project, he said.

I think Premier Horgan is setting up a false question when he raises things of that nature,” he said. “We refine more product than we use, so we are a net exporter of refined product. Could we refine more, sure. But I think we have to make sure the economics work for that.”

McMillan noted that the presidents of the ScotiaBank and the Royal Bank have spoken out in recent days, warning that continued disruption of pipeline investments is causing investment loss from Canada.

RELATED: Business groups call for action on pipeline

McMillan joined representatives of the mining, forest and other industries in Vancouver Thursday to call for urgent federal action to get the Trans Mountain project moving.

Just Posted

Chemainus Fun Run participants spice up their lives

Inaugural Pumpkin Spice event adds a dash of excitement to sunny November day

Who was Chris Bloomfield, the Mill Bay man shot by police?

A troubled man with a voracious appetite for illicit drugs and a non-conventional lifestyle

BC Ferries passengers wait to leave Vancouver Island after Remembrance Day

Traffic aboard BC Ferries slows after Remembrance Day long weekend

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Vancouver Island remembers

Important stories shared as Islanders salute those who made the greatest sacrifice

Student arrested at Vancouver Island elementary school

Pupils never in danger, incident unrelated to the school

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Most Read